Contact

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Dr. Mason Dean
Currently independent scientist, group leader from November 1st, 2017
Phone:+49 331 567-9452Fax:+49 331 567-9402

Collaboration

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Ronald Seidel
PhD Student
Phone:9237Fax:9402

Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces

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James Weaver
Ph.D

Wyss Institute, Harvard, Center for Life Science Boston Bldg., 5th Floor 3 Blackfan Circle Boston, MA 02115

Wyss

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Ling Li
Postdoc

Wyss Institute, Harvard, Center for Life Science Boston Bldg., 5th Floor 3 Blackfan Circle Boston, MA 02115

Wyss

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Dr. Daniel Baum
Phone:+49 30 84185-107Fax:+49 30 84185-107
Email:baum@...

ZIB, Takustr. 7, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem, Germany

Zuse Institute Berlin (ZIB)

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David Knötel
Phone:+49 30 84185-151Fax:+49 30 84185-125

ZIB, Takustr. 7, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem, Germany

Zuse Institute Berlin (ZIB)

Nature´s puncture-resistant flexible composites: Design lessons from cartilaginous fish skeletons

Nature attains impressive material properties with a comparatively simple palette of ingredients, assembled at low temperatures. The structures and growth processes of natural systems, however, are often too complex to mimic, making extraction of design principles difficult. Our Human Frontier Science Program project investigates the skeletons of sharks and rays, composites with unique material properties and a tiled structure particularly amenable to modeling.

The research team represents a diversity of backgrounds and expertises, ranging from biology and biomaterials science (MPIKG), to high-resolution imaging, fracture mechanics, and physical modeling (Wyss), to computer science and visualization (ZIB). The rich mix of approaches allow us to illuminate design constraints for a poorly understood, but phylogenetically old, skeletal alternative to bone, but also to query productive interaction spaces between biology and engineering sciences.

Although all team members are involved in all ongoing studies supported by the HFSP, each sub-project is led by a different research team/institution; click the links to the left for more information on each sub-project:

The tiled outer layer of shark and ray skeletons is a natural composite of mineralized polygonal tiles (tesserae) and collagen fiber bundles, the complex and finescale 3d arrangements of which have made characterization difficult.

Tesserae ultrastructure and ontogeny

The tiled outer layer of shark and ray skeletons is a natural composite of mineralized polygonal tiles (tesserae) and collagen fiber bundles, the complex and finescale 3d arrangements of which have made characterization difficult. [more]
A detailed quantitative analysis of image data often requires the segmentation to make structures measurable. This is particularly challenging for biological structures, such as tesserae, because their arrangements are typically 3-dimensional and complex

Tiling morphologies and segmentation

A detailed quantitative analysis of image data often requires the segmentation to make structures measurable. This is particularly challenging for biological structures, such as tesserae, because their arrangements are typically 3-dimensional and complex [more]
The tessellated mineralization of shark and ray skeletons occurs near the surface, sandwiched between a fibrous outer layer (the perichondrium) and the unmineralized cartilage core of the skeleton.

Tesserae mechanics & materials

The tessellated mineralization of shark and ray skeletons occurs near the surface, sandwiched between a fibrous outer layer (the perichondrium) and the unmineralized cartilage core of the skeleton. [more]

 
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